Online Course Offerings

2018 Fall-Winter Online Courses

  • 2018F (September – December)
  • 2018FW (September – April)
  • 2019W (January – April)

Thorneloe courses offered through Laurentian Online

Registration info at https://laurentian.ca/online-distance-education > Course Offerings, Apply & Register, Important Dates

Current Laurentian students can register on Webadvisor

Textbooks will be listed at and available through the Laurentian Bookstore

2019W Important Dates

Registration Deadline: January 18, 2019
Course Dates: January 7 – April 5, 2019
Invigilated Exams: April 8 – 27, 2019

ANCS 1006 Greek Civilization – Dr. Liz Warman

A preparation for future courses both in Classical Studies and other subjects, this course provides an introduction to Greek culture and civilization and a general study of Greek literature, religion, philosophy, art and architecture, social and political thought, and Greek influences on the course of Western society. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both ANSC 1006, CLAS 1006 and CLAS 1005. Lecture (3.00). Equivalent to CLAS-1006EG.

RLST 1116 Ideas of Love I – Dr. Ron Srigley

This course explores the theme of love, with the aim of introducing students to the concerns and methods of religious inquiry. A variety of ideas of love, human and divine, from selected religious and literary works are examined in relation to questions of spirituality, marriage and the family, justice and morality. The course focuses on writings from the ancient and medieval to the early modern periods. (T) (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both RLST 1116 and RLST 1215.

RLST 2136 Christian Thought and Culture I – Dr. Wayne Sheppard

This course is a study of the principal ideas, persons and historical movements which determined the development of the Christian tradition from the early Church Fathers, through the Middle Ages, to the Reformation of the 16th century. Particular attention is placed on the intellectual origins of the main branches of Christianity – Roman Catholicism, Orthodoxy and Protestantism. (T) (lec 3) cr 3.

RLST 2326 Dimensions of the Paranormal – Dr. Wayne Sheppard

This course critically examines the religious and cultural significance of paranormal phenomena (such as near-death experience, telepathy, clairvoyance, UFO contact and abduction). By studying first-hand accounts, films, academic studies and selected new paranormal religious movements, students critically assess both the nature of the evidence and the different ways of accounting for it: mythic-religious, scientific, philosophic and psychoanalytic. (T) (lec 3) cr 3.

RLST 3166 Mark’s Gospel – Dr. Spencer Boersma

This course examines the earliest New Testament account of the life of Jesus. Emphasis is placed on the controversies surrounding the historicity of Jesus, his understanding of his mission, his trial and execution, and the post-resurrection appearances. (T) (lec 3) cr 3.

RLST 3306 Issues in Religion and Science – Dr. Wayne Sheppard

This course explores the relationship between religion and modern science in Western culture. While some attention is given to the historical impact of scientific discoveries upon religious belief, the primary focus is on contemporary issues involving religion and science. (T) (lec 3) cr 3.

THEA 2356 Theatre in Education I – Matthew Heiti

This course is an introduction to various aspects of children’s theatre, including rehearsing and performing a play for children, and developing theatrical techniques and lesson plans useful in teaching at intermediate and senior levels. (lec 3, exp 3) cr 3.

WGSX 2007 Women as Visual Artists II: Contemporary Art and Issues – Janet Clark

This course studies women as contemporary visual artists as well as the issues that inform their art. Emphasis is placed on Feminism and its impact on women’s art and imagery. The work of Canadian women artists is included in the course content. Students may not retain credit for both WGSX 2007, WOMN 2007 and WOMN 2005. (lec 3) cr 3.

WGSX 2016 The Production of Knowledge – Dr. Mandy Koolen

This course introduces students to the development of feminist theories in the modern era. It examines various theoretical frameworks and contemporary debates and dilemmas within feminism. PREREQ: WGSX/WOMN 2016 or permission of the department. Students cannot retain credit for both WGSX 3015, WOMN 3015 and WOMN 3125. (lec 2, sem 1) cr 6.

WGSX 2036 Gender, Work and Families – Carolyn Djaferis

The focus of this course is on understanding “women’s work” and “men’s work” as gendered practices. Economics of paid and unpaid work at various scales of production and reproduction including the family and the nation state are examined. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both WGSX 2036, WOMN 2036 and either WOMN 2035 or 3035.

WGSX 2106 Representations of Women and Gender in the News Media – Elizabeth McDougall

This course examines the work of women in news journalism; assumptions, purposes and practices regarding the representation of gender, class and sexualities; and the extent to which these are being challenged by feminist writers and activists. (lec 3) cr 3. Students cannot retain credit for both WGSX 2106 and WOMN 2106.

WGSX 2357 Women and Aging – Dr. Margaret Kechnie

This course focuses on the problems women face as they age. Topics may include widowhood, poverty and the double standard of aging. Students also consider the adequacy of initiatives which attempt to address the problems. (lec 3) cr 3. Students cannot retain credit for both WGSX 2357 and WOMN 2357.

WGSX 3306 Female Sexualities – Elia Eliev

This interdisciplinary course explores the complexities of female sexual identities, experiences and practices. Beginning from an understanding that sexuality is culturally and historically constructed, topics studied may include historical, medical and scientific discourses of female sexualities; female sexualities at the intersections of race, class, ethnicity and disability; and sex and representation. (lec 3) cr 3. Students cannot retain credit for both WGSX 3306 and WOMN 3306.

Connect with Thorneloe

Who Do We Think We Are? Uncovering Racism in Scholarly Pursuits: An Interdisciplinary Forum

Read More

Are Women Human (Yet)? Gender and the Inklings

Read More

Event at the Fielding Memorial Chapel of St. Mark: 6 Simple Steps to Greater Health

Read More

The Origins of Halloween

Read More